Introducing a breakthrough in vision surgery. Now there’s a revolutionary new way to potentially leave your glasses behind – introducing the multifocal IOL intraocular lens (IOL), a breakthrough in vision surgery. Multifocal IOL has been uniquely designed to improve vision at all distances – up close, far away and everything in-between – giving cataract patients their best chance to live free of glasses.
As we grow older, our bodies mature and change naturally. Within the aging eye, these changes often develop into conditions that impact the quality of your vision. But if you’re experiencing age-related visual problems, don’t give up – with successful treatment, it may be possible to have clearer, brighter and sharper vision than you’ve had for a long, long time.
Cataracts – A cataract is a change in the clarity, or a “clouding,” of the lens in your eye. Your crystalline lens, which is made mostly of protein and water, can become clouded enough to prevent light and images from reaching the retina. A cataract can be the reason sharp images become blurred and seeing things at night becomes more difficult. More than half of all Americans age 65 and older have a cataract¹, and cataracts are the leading cause of treatable blindness. For more on cataract treatment, read about cataract surgery.

Freedom. See it in your eyes:

Introducing a breakthrough in vision surgery. Now there’s a revolutionary new way to potentially leave your glasses behind – introducing the multifocal IOL intraocular lens (IOL), a breakthrough in vision surgery. Multifocal IOL has been uniquely designed to improve vision at all distances – up close, far away and everything in-between – giving cataract patients their best chance to live free of glasses.

Conditions of the Aging Eye:

As we grow older, our bodies mature and change naturally. Within the aging eye, these changes often develop into conditions that impact the quality of your vision. But if you’re experiencing age-related visual problems, don’t give up – with successful treatment, it may be possible to have clearer, brighter and sharper vision than you’ve had for a long, long time.

Some common problems with aging eyes:

Cataracts – A cataract is a change in the clarity, or a “clouding,” of the lens in your eye. Your crystalline lens, which is made mostly of protein and water, can become clouded enough to prevent light and images from reaching the retina. A cataract can be the reason sharp images become blurred and seeing things at night becomes more difficult. More than half of all Americans age 65 and older have a cataract¹, and cataracts are the leading cause of treatable blindness. For more on cataract treatment, read about cataract surgery.

Cataract-aged patients may also have a condition known as presbyopia:

Presbyopia – As people enter their 40s, they may experience blurred vision when performing everyday “close-up” tasks such as reading, sewing or working at the computer. This condition, called presbyopia, occurs as the lens in the eye becomes less flexible, and the muscles controlling the lens weaken. This is why some people need reading glasses or need to hold objects farther away to see them.

Cataract surgery is an outpatient procedure that will only take a few hours. When you arrive, your eyes may be treated with eye drops and anesthetic to minimize any discomfort during the operation.

After Cataract Surgery:
After the procedure, you’ll be given a short time to rest. Then, the very same day, you can go home. Within the next 24 hours, your doctor will probably want to see you for an evaluation. Drops will be prescribed to guard against infection and to help your eyes heal. For a few days, you may need to wear a clear shield, especially at night, to prevent you from rubbing your eye.

Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide. It is estimated that 40-50 million people throughout the world suffer from blindness. Almost half of these are due to cataracts. Fortunately, today, this is a very treatable disease. In fact, here in the United States alone, over one and a half million cataract surgeries are successfully completed every year. However, in third world countries where advanced medical techniques are not available or where poverty is prevalent and medical conditions go untreated, many millions of people remain visually disabled unnecessarily.

cataractsSPLIT

lensThere is a common misconception that a cataract is a “film or growth” over the eye that needs to be scraped away. In reality, it’s a simple clouding of the otherwise clear natural lens inside the eye. The eye works much like a camera. The light has to be able to pass through to be clearly focused on the retina at the back of the eye. The natural lens produces a major part of the focusing power and must provide a clean, sharp image. Any cloudiness or distortion in the lens results in a blurred image. Cataract comes from the Greek term meaning “waterfall”. It refers to the blurred image one might see if the world were viewed through a thin sheet of falling water.
No. There is no one single cause of cataracts. They don’t develop by reading too much or over using your eyes, nor do they develop by sitting too close to the T.V. as a child or by excessive computer work as an adult. In most cases, cataracts cause no harm or damage to the eye, they just blur the vision, making daily tasks such as reading and driving progressively more difficult.
The development of cataract changes in the natural lens is multi factorial with a long list of possible causes. By far, the most common cause of cataracts and blurred vision is the natural aging process of eye. Even though some children may actually be born with cataracts, most people develop cataracts in their 70’s & 80’s. However, just about everything has some influence on our vision, including ultraviolet light exposure, genetic predisposition, diseases that you may have had over your lifetime or the medications taken for those diseases and any injury or major trauma to the eye. Since everyone’s lifestyle and medical history are so different, it’s not uncommon to see cataracts at any age. Often times it’s impossible to identify the cause, but the treatment is always the same. In most instances, cataracts can be found in both eyes but it is frequently asymmetrical with one eye much worse than the other. Because each person is so different, it is difficult to predict how quickly your cataracts may progress. The clouding may proceed at a rapid rate and cause disability and significant blurring in only a few short months. On the other hand, many people know they have cataracts but have no change in their vision for many years.
Common symptoms include increasing difficulty performing day-to-day tasks such as reading and driving your car, especially at night. Since the cataract is a clouding or darkening of the natural lens in your eye, it’s like wearing sunglasses in the house. You need more light just to read normally. Night time becomes especially difficult not only from the low light level but also due to glare. The light that passes through a cataract is scattered and unable to focus. Car lights and street lights create a major source of glare and decreased vision. You might complain of a filmy appearance to your vision and find yourself constantly trying to clean your glasses without success. As your cataract worsen, it also changes your prescription. Frequent changes in your glasses and difficulty improving your vision with new prescriptions is common. Even double or triple images in one eye can be caused by a cataract. Only a complete, dilated exam by your eye care professional can correctly diagnose a cataract and evaluate your vision. The good news is that with modern advances in surgical techniques and treatment, cataract surgery has become one of the most effective and highly successful procedures known within the medical community.